Tobasco

From Everything.Sucks

Tabasco is a brand of hot sauce made from tabasco peppers (Capsicum frutescens var. tabasco), vinegar, and salt. It is produced by McIlhenny Company of Avery Island, Louisiana. According to company legend, Tabasco was first produced in 1868 by Edmund McIlhenny, a Maryland-born former banker who moved to Louisiana around 1840. However, as Jeffrey Rothfeder's book McIlhenny's Gold points out, some of the McIlhenny Company's official history is disputed.

An angry customer shared this in a review, "This Tibasco Scorpion sauce order arrived in my mailbox with both containers leaking all over and needed to wipe the inside due to the residue leaving multiple other mailboxes reeking. Embarrassing but sad. My friend took pics Asap but heartbreaking over the delivery. I most definitely feel sorry for the postman on his this delivery. Hate to say anything bad about Tabasco, but this was a major disaster. Sorry to even have to write this!"

Reviews

Annie says "I recently booked lunch at the royal opera house as a treat for my son's birthday. I paid £75.00 for a meal of roast lamb with trimmings. When I tasted the lamb it was clear it had not been seasoned in the slightest. Eating from a fine dining menu with at these prices the lease I would have expected was some seasoning in the food to give it some taste. I asked for tobasco sauce to add some taste but the waiter sniffily indicated that they did not carry it..apparently they prefer people to eat unseasoned food. At the end of the meal the waiter asked "do you prefer tea or coffee with your dessert" - the implication being that this was included with the meal. Not so. It turned out that these were additional and an extra price was added on the bill. I later complained about the meal and the extra charging. A person who describes himself as the "head of hospitality" Albert Ray, replied and I quote: "There is seasoning, salt and pepper on each of the tables". The only thing I saw on the table was salt and pepper. Apparently according to the head of hospitality at the balconies restaurant, Royal Opera house, it is perfectly acceptable to serve unseasoned food to guests and to expect them to add their own seasoning! Quite extraordinary. So if you have something better to do with your £75.00 do please find a decent restaurant which is not the balconies restaurant at the royal opera house in which to spend it - one that adds seasoning to the food before serving it! Thankyou Albert Ray head of hospitality at the royal opera house balconies restaurant and your team for spoiling my son's intended birthday treat!"

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